Can Anyone Help me with Implementing Open-Source Tools for BIM Workflows?

Hello there,
I am new to the world of open source architecture tools and I am excited to dive deeper into the OSArch ecosystem. I have been working with proprietary software for BIM workflows. but I am eager to transition to open source alternatives to enhance collaboration and innovation in my projects.
It would be great for me if you provide me your guidance;
What are the leading open source BIM software options available today?
How do you integrate open source tools into your existing workflows? Are there any particular challenges I should be aware of when transitioning from proprietary software?
What are the best practices for ensuring smooth collaboration between team members using different software platforms?
Can you suggest any tutorials, courses, or documentation that are particularly helpful for getting up to speed with open source BIM tools? Any tips on where to start would be fantastic.
Also, I have gone through this post; https://community.osarch.org/discussion/1457/1-day-blue-prsim-opensource-workflow-accredited-course which definitely helped me out a lot.
If you have successfully implemented open source tools in your projects, I would love to hear about your experiences. What worked well, and what would you do differently?
Thank you all in advance for your help and assistance.

Genaro

Comments

  • Have you seen https://wiki.osarch.org/index.php?title=AEC_Free_Software_directory ? Using more FOSS tools to replace portions of your workflow is probably a safe bet. E.g. using Krita instead of Photoshop for touching up images. Use Blender for arch viz. Use Ladybug Tools for environmental analysis. Use QGIS with OSM data for geographic and context analysis. Use Speckle for transferring data across platforms.

    I'd say on the BIM authoring side the open source world is simultaneously very behind the proprietary equivalents as well as significantly ahead. Very behind in terms of user-facing functionality and ease of use, but very ahead in terms of data processing capabilities, automation, and flexibility. In what capacity are you planning on using this? Small project delivery? Large project coordination? Authoring? Receiving? That makes quite a difference in how its used and what it's good / bad at :)

    JohnduarteframosGenaro
  • I didnt know about Krita. Is it better than Gimp?

  • @RaphaëlVouilloz said:
    I didnt know about Krita. Is it better than Gimp?

    Krita is more like Paint. While Gimp is more like Lightroom. In combination they replace Photoshop. Though there's a more direct competitor like Adobe Fresco.

    RaphaëlVouilloz
  • @lizaclarraa said:
    Hello there,
    I am new to the world of open source architecture tools and I am excited to dive deeper into the OSArch ecosystem. I have been working with proprietary software for BIM workflows. but I am eager to transition to open source alternatives to enhance collaboration and innovation in my projects.
    It would be great for me if you provide me your guidance;

    https://wiki.osarch.org/index.php?title=Regard3D+Blender+FreeCAD_workflow

    Genaro
  • It's fantastic that you're exploring open-source BIM tools!
    Here's some guidance to help you transition:

    • Modeling: FreeCAD (https://www.freecad.org/) offers basic BIM functionality and IFC compatibility for data exchange. For architectural design, some communities recommend looking into ArchiLibre (https://archilibre.org/), though it's under active development.
    • Viewing and Coordination: IFC viewers like BIM Vision (https://bimvision.eu/download/) allow you to see models from various BIM programs. Tekla BIMsight (https://www.tekla.com/products/tekla-bimsight/download) is another option with clash detection capabilities.
    • Data Exchange: The Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) standard is crucial for open BIM workflows. xBIM Toolkit (https://github.com/xBimTeam) is a developer tool for working with IFC data.
      Remember, open-source BIM is an evolving landscape. Be prepared to adapt and learn as new tools and workflows emerge. Good luck on your open-source BIM journey!
    JanFGenaro
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