IFC Wall material layers - best practice

I am keen to hear the forum members' thoughts on how timber framed, or metal framed walls will in-fill insulation is handled IFC wall material layers.
Here in Aotearoa NZ we typically build houses and smaller buildings using 'light timber framing' similar to parts of Australia and USA.
The question is what is good practice in IFC? ![]
thank you in advance :)
(https://community.osarch.org/uploads/editor/4o/5dxtdwepmiko.png "")

KoAraatomkarinca

Comments

  • Hi @Nigel

    I am keen to hear the forum members' thoughts on how timber framed, or metal framed walls will in-fill insulation is handled IFC wall material layers.
    Here in Aotearoa NZ we typically build houses and smaller buildings using 'light timber framing' similar to parts of Australia and USA.
    The question is what is good practice in IFC? ![]
    thank you in advance :)

    interesting topic!

    I would gladly extend the request to other parts like: what's best IFC practice for foundations or floors, for instance, or when it comes to walls if plaster is together with blocks or separate covering layer instead..
    I understand it depends on several factors but it would be useful to have an exchange on it I think

    I can prepare an example of how I'd usually IFC the elements in my takeoff models

    emiliotassoKoAraNigel
  • Very interesting. I too would like to know good methods.
    I would like to see you discuss insulation for pipes and ducts as well as walls.
    The IFC in Wiki.OSArch states to use Material layer set if it is just walls. what about framed walls?
    https://wiki.osarch.org/index.php?title=IFC_-_Industry_Foundation_Classes/IFC_materials
    One of the IFC entities is IfcCovering.
    https://ifc43-docs.standards.buildingsmart.org/IFC/RELEASE/IFC4x3/HTML/lexical/IfcCovering.htm

  • timtim
    edited July 10

    @Nigel said:
    I am keen to hear the forum members' thoughts on how timber framed, or metal framed walls will in-fill insulation is handled IFC wall material layers.
    Here in Aotearoa NZ we typically build houses and smaller buildings using 'light timber framing' similar to parts of Australia and USA.
    The question is what is good practice in IFC? ![]
    thank you in advance :)
    (https://community.osarch.org/uploads/editor/4o/5dxtdwepmiko.png "")

    For material layers I have only ever done one layer for "insulated timber/metal studs". When the wall continues beyond a part that requires insulation, I split the wall and continue it with a new wall with a layer for "timber/metal studs" (uninsulated).

    KoAra
  • @steverugi said:
    Hi @Nigel

    I am keen to hear the forum members' thoughts on how timber framed, or metal framed walls will in-fill insulation is handled IFC wall material layers.
    Here in Aotearoa NZ we typically build houses and smaller buildings using 'light timber framing' similar to parts of Australia and USA.
    The question is what is good practice in IFC? ![]
    thank you in advance :)

    interesting topic!

    I would gladly extend the request to other parts like: what's best IFC practice for foundations or floors, for instance, or when it comes to walls if plaster is together with blocks or separate covering layer instead..
    I understand it depends on several factors but it would be useful to have an exchange on it I think

    I can prepare an example of how I'd usually IFC the elements in my takeoff models

    The approach you take can vary based on the project and construction methods. In my recent project, I utilized a method that distinguished between "wall types" and "covering types." A "wall type" could refer to a complete wall, including its coverings, or just the structural/framed part, excluding coverings. On the other hand, a "covering type" pertained to the finished covering including its fixing system.

    For walls, I found it beneficial to separate coverings in the following situations:

    1. Structurally Engineered Components: When a wall included a structurally engineered component, such as concrete or core-filled blockwork, separating the coverings allowed for a clear delineation between disciplines (this also relates to foundations). This approach helped avoid redundant documentation, reducing the risk of errors.

    2. Height Differences: In cases where there was a required height difference, particularly in exterior situations, the "wall type" extended from slab to slab, while the "covering type" covered the slab edge and continued up multiple stories. This separation ensured that each component had the correct height, didn't conflict with the floor slabs, and ensured the exterior precisely aligned over multiple stories.

    By conditionally separating "wall types" and "covering types" I was able to maintain a relatively condensed wall and covering schedule while being able to accurately cover a variety of conditions.

    For floor, roof, and ceiling types, I used a similar conditional logic. Except, rather than needing to control the heights differently, I needed to control their extents on the horizontal plane differently.

    KoAraJohnduarteframossteverugiMassimo
  • thanks @tim
    I too use separation between wall core (an IfcWallType with concrete hollow or solid blocks) and plaster (IfcCoveringType, USERDEFINED = plaster), in my case I also lay the plaster on the internal face of the wall, going around projecting structural columns if present.
    This also allows me to identify different plastering+finishing in a specific IfcCoveringType
    Out of curiosity: what about blinding layer under foundation elements, IfcCovering? cheers

    KoAra
  • I don't think it's a covering. What about IfcSlab, BASESLAB?

    steverugiKoAra
  • Hi @tim :
    How about screed (light concrete between structural and finish floor) IfcSlab or IfcCovering? I'd lean toward the latter (USERDEFINED = screed)
    I'm surprised such construction feature hasn't been captured in Ifc (?), if not as a class at least as predefined type
    thanks

  • I’d lean towards a screed being the ‘fill’ component of the material layer set of an IfcCovering-FLOORING.

    NigelKoAra
  • thanks @timeandprice

    I’d lean towards a screed being the ‘fill’ component of the material layer set of an IfcCovering-FLOORING.

    Good, I almost got it right this time :D

    KoAra
  • I would agree with screed being a floor covering. It's also a bit of a funny one in that sometimes it's a bit hard to remove (I think?) if no bond breaker is used.

    KoArasteverugi
  • Thank you all for your insights. It became an interesting conversation. My original reason for asking is my quest of making a classifying and naming guidefor exporting ifc out of revit and archicad. This could clean up the "shambles of random' and produce clean spreadsheets exported from BBIM.

    steverugi
  • edited July 19

    @tim said:
    I added a request:

    Wouldn't plaster deserve a predefined term under IfcCovering as well?
    And paint too, at least a combination of the two?
    ..or there is an explanation for their absence?

    Roel
  • I don't think it's the Ifc approach to match classifications with materials as you would end up duplicating information more than necessary.

    That said, for Plaster or Wallboard, I did expect to see WALLLINING as a predefined type under IfcCovering. I see they are covered in IfcWall-ELEMENTEDWALL. However, this wouldn't suit all use cases. As an architect, I like to keep structurally engineered walls separate. This allows for a better workflow when updating structural information. For example, a combined exterior wall assembly could consist of:
    IfcCovering-CLADDING | IfcWall-SOLIDWALL | IfcCovering-USERDEFINED: WALLLINING

    I wonder why WALLLINING is not a predefined type?

    steverugiNigelKoAra
  • I was thinking that LoadBearing in Pset_SlabCommon or Pset_WallCommon would sort out the structure or something.

  • @tim said:
    I don't think it's the Ifc approach to match classifications with materials as you would end up duplicating information more than necessary.

    That said, for Plaster or Wallboard, I did expect to see WALLLINING as a predefined type under IfcCovering. I see they are covered in IfcWall-ELEMENTEDWALL. However, this wouldn't suit all use cases. As an architect, I like to keep structurally engineered walls separate. This allows for a better workflow when updating structural information. For example, a combined exterior wall assembly could consist of:
    IfcCovering-CLADDING | IfcWall-SOLIDWALL | IfcCovering-USERDEFINED: WALLLINING

    I wonder why WALLLINING is not a predefined type?

    I totally agree

    one more thing..

    In many parts of the world the sequence is very simple, with some little variation: paint | skimming | plaster |blockwork (hollow or solid concrete) |plaster| skimming | paint
    the implementation of these layers into a single layerset is not always the best solution

    • as @tim nicely showed above, outside plaster is often a covering spanning from ground to roof
    • finishing might be different, especially in internal walls, and needs to be identified separately
    • when walls and RC frame meet the covering layer goes around columns or beams

    I like this exchange, we are getting somewhere :)

    Massimo
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