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Model in Blender BIM

edited February 2022 in General

I'm a SketchUp user and I'm new to Blender so I would like to know if there are some guidances to model in Blender for the BIM Addon.

I've started with the tutorials shared in this forum and this video is the first one I've found that, instead of importing an IFC, the geometry is introduced directly in Blender but it's not explained deeply.

Comments

  • I would just recommend learning Blender first. After becoming accustom, learn BlenderBIM.

  • edited December 2020

    There are lots of good tutorial for learning blender for architecture if that's what you're looking for. Take a look on YouTube. Try and take the newest ones. https://www.blenderguru.com/tutorials/category/Architecture has some good content.

    Don't forget to look at https://wiki.osarch.org/index.php?title=Blender where there are some links to videos. Let us know if you find some other good ones. Then look at the list of add-ins and some of them also have tutorials on YouTube and other places. If you've got the time then the info is out there. Please help us out by noting where what you find that you think is worth sharing.

    We need a series of 'Switching to Blender from ...' tutorials

  • To learn Blender, try this... the best that I have known...

  • Thank you for the answers. I will take a look at it and I will tell you if I find it useful.

    @duncan said:
    We need a series of 'Switching to Blender from ...' tutorials

    I've followed some of the tutorials for SketchUp users and I found useful:

    The problem is trying to apply it to Blender BIM. For example, drawing a DumbWall, some modifiers are used and I'm learning through trial and error.

  • @agonzalezesteve coming from SketchUp you might want to check out this thread that has links to some videos specifically for SketchUp users coming to blender. https://community.osarch.org/discussion/comment/1580

    bernd
  • I've checked the resources but they are architecture oriented when I want it for Energy Analysis. In fact, I'm an OpenStudio user in SketchUp, so I use SketchUp for drawing really simple geometries.

    @baswein said:
    @agonzalezesteve coming from SketchUp you might want to check out this thread that has links to some videos specifically for SketchUp users coming to blender. https://community.osarch.org/discussion/comment/1580

    @baswein, thank you, I've seen this before and I followed the tutorials.

    baswein
  • edited December 2020

    @agonzalezesteve said:
    The problem is trying to apply it to Blender BIM. For example, drawing a DumbWall, some modifiers are used and I'm learning through trial and error.

    Have you tried Blender's Archipack Add-on? you can try it and see if it makes modelling a bit easy for you. Then you can use the BlenderBim Add-on on your model to achieve your BIM objectives.

  • @agonzalezesteve if you are modeling for energy analysis, then you probably won't need to use any complex tools - even the dumb wall is probably unnecessary as it creates a wall thickness. You probably just want to model cubes and move vertices around. Is there some issue you're having with that?

  • @Moult said:
    @agonzalezesteve if you are modeling for energy analysis, then you probably won't need to use any complex tools - even the dumb wall is probably unnecessary as it creates a wall thickness. You probably just want to model cubes and move vertices around. Is there some issue you're having with that?

    Not all energy modeling paradigm are flat (like gbXML). Many case require full geometry (not details but thickness, materials, interior/exterior surfaces etc…).

    Moultiosvarms
  • I'll try to explain better our current situation. I'm an OpenStudio and SketchUp developer that uses their Ruby APIs for adapting the tools to our energy modeling workflows. We use OpenStudio for energy performance for sustainability certifications (LEED, BREEAM...) and Spanish certification (SG Save). In order to avoid redrawing the building in other softwares, we use the same OpenStudio model for Radiance simulations (where wall thickness matters) and acoustic analysis. The problem is that that we are storing some information in a data structure that is not ready for it. In addition, we are using Revit for life cycle analysis because the structural elements cannot be stored in an energy model. I thought it could be a great chance to move to Blender BIM to enrich an IFC instead of an OpenStudio model and then translate to different open source engines to run energy or daylight simulations like Ladybug Tools, but with an open source 3D software.

    When I opened this discussion I didn't find this one where @Cyril links other topics. There is some development in progress where I could help? I leave you an example of what we do. I don't know Python but it's similar to Ruby and I learned coding in college with C++, so it won't be worse!

    @iosvarms said:
    Have you tried Blender's Archipack Add-on? you can try it and see if it makes modelling a bit easy for you. Then you can use the BlenderBim Add-on on your model to achieve your BIM objectives.

    No, I will try it, thank you @iosvarms.

    CGRbaswein
  • CGRCGR
    edited December 2020

    @Cyril said:

    @Moult said:
    @agonzalezesteve if you are modeling for energy analysis, then you probably won't need to use any complex tools - even the dumb wall is probably unnecessary as it creates a wall thickness. You probably just want to model cubes and move vertices around. Is there some issue you're having with that?

    Not all energy modeling paradigm are flat (like gbXML). Many case require full geometry (not details but thickness, materials, interior/exterior surfaces etc…).

    This is true, tho have a look at vi suite for energy analysis, which can interpret thickness in the node together with material configuration, no need for complex modeling if i understood it correctly?

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